This Is a Movie Review: Sicario: Day of the Soldado

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CREDIT: Richard Foreman, Jr./SMPSP

I give Sicario: Day of the Soldado 2.5 out of 5 False Flags: https://uinterview.com/reviews/movies/sicario-day-of-the-soldado-movie-review-cia-vs-drug-cartel-sequel-is-tense-and-well-crafted-but-shallow/

Best Movie Scenes of 2015

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The best mini-movies that had us rocking in and falling out of our seats in the past year.

King-Bob

10. Jurassic World, T. Rex vs. Indominus Rex – A.K.A the 2015 Late Night War.

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Best Films of 2015

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Clockwise from Top Left: Inside Out; Spotlight; Ex Machina; The Big Short (CREDIT: YouTube Screenshots)

Box office records kept falling in 2015, and some of the biggest blockbusters were actually among the best films of the year! This is appropriate enough, as bigness was the name of the day in 2015, with Big Emotions and Big Ideas all over this list. Whether it was through muckraking journalism and statesmanship, the birth of new heroes, or the burning desire to make personal connections, the makers of the best films of 2015 made sure audiences heard what they had to say.

This top 10 list was originally posted on Starpulse in December 2015.

1. The Big Short – Spoiler alert: as the wild ride of Adam McKay’s adaptation of Michael Lewis’ bestselling nonfiction thriller about the players who anticipated the bursting of the U.S. housing bubble settles into its conclusion, the epilogue reveals that every Wall Street fraudster was imprisoned and new stringent legal regulations have been implemented to prevent another crisis. Except, of course, that didn’t happen. This is an esoteric topic, but the audience for “The Big Short” knows it has been screwed. The level at which this swindling occurred is astounding and ridiculous, and the filmmaking that captures it is just as absurdly gut-wrenching.

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This is a Movie Review: Sicario

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SicarioEmily

A lot of action movies can leave their audiences feeling confused and exasperated. Sicario encourages that reaction by putting its protagonist in the same position. At the beginning of a mission to hunt down a major cartel boss, FBI agent Kate Mercer (Emily Blunt) is appalled by her team’s reckless deployment of force in broad daylight in front of hundreds of civilians at a customs checkpoint. Kate insists that this approach is completely illegal, and then Sicario reveals its hand: that is exactly the point. To go after the highest echelons of the drug trade requires entering into and getting batted around by chaos. Acknowledging and embracing that insanity is what allows Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro to get away with dangerously swaggy and scary/empathetic performances, respectively, and Emily Blunt to still be awesome despite the complete frustration of her badass style.